PSYCO 403

ADVANCED PERCEPTION

 

 

syllabus

syllabus
(Winter, 2020)

calendar


course
calendar

lecture notes

lecture
notes

blog post assignments

blog post
assignments

(Winter, 2020)

PeerWise questions

PeerWise
questions

(Winter, 2020)

eClass

   eClass

advanced perception websites

advanced
perception
websites

home page

home
page

News & Updates

 

• NOTE: this class was previously called PSYCO 365; read about the history of this course in my blog post The End of Perception

 

• here’s information on the YorkU Centre for Vision Research vision science summer school

 

• online resources for coursepack readings:

- Mather (2016): Depth perception

- Snowdon, Thompson, & Troscianko (2012): The perception of faces

 

• textbook/readings errata:

- the meaning of functional architecture in the readings is not the same as the meaning defined in class

- in Enns (2004a) on page 31: “The conservative strategy would lead to 100 percent correct on "no difference" trials and 0 percent correct on "difference" trials, and together these would average 50 percent correct overall. The conservative strategy would lead to 0 percent correct on "no difference" trials and 100 percent correct on "difference" trials, again for 50 percent correct overall.” The second sentence should begin “The liberal strategy...”

- in Enns (2004b) on page 150: “The same circle’s invisibility in Figure 4.17b points to...” should be “in Figure 4.18b...”

- in Palmer (1999b) on page 173, column 1, line 32: “...convolution of an edge operator with an image.*” should include a footnote:
* Technically, the operation described on pages 173 and 174 is the cross correlation of the edge operator and the image, but it is usually referred to as convolution in the computer vision literature (see Nalwa, 1993, p. 66). The convolution is actually the cross correlation of the image with the reflection of the edge operator about its center. Cross-correlation and convolution are therefore identical operations for any symmetric edge operators (e.g., Figures 4.3.1 C, D, and E), but not for asymmetric operators (e.g., Figures 4.3.1 A and B). Convolution is preferred in the computer vision community because of several important mathematical properties, such as commutativity, associativity, and distributivity over addition.

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 156: “Each black mark in 7.1b...” should be “Each white mark in 7.1b...”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 158: “Various examples of the scientific meaning of of symmetry are shown in 7.6...” should be “Various examples of the scientific meaning of of symmetry are shown in 7.6...”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 158: “Figure 7.9 shows an example of the kind of random dot computer-generated stimuli...” should be “Figure 7.8 shows an example of...”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 162: “...the overall outline of the teddy bear, 7.11d, the teddy bear’s eyes and nose, 7.11e, and the teddy bear’s muzzle, 7.11f” should be “...the overall outline of the teddy bear, 7.11f, the teddy bear’s eyes and nose, 7.11e, and the teddy bear’s muzzle, 7.11d

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 163: “It easy to envisage the AND gate grouping procedure...” should be “It is easy to envisage the AND gate grouping procedure...”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 164: “...the Vasarely painting, 7.7.” should be “...the image by Frisby, 7.2.”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 166: “A common strategy in this kind of research is find instances of texture differences..” should be “A common strategy in this kind of research is to find instances of texture differences..”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 168: “If you look back at the chair example, 7.13, the way Marr’s program brought together edges with similar orientations can be thought of as a instance of...” should be “...can be thought of as an instance of...”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 171: “So to are the interrupted lines.” should be “So too are the interrupted lines.”

- in Frisby & Stone (2010) on page 172: “bocks world” should be “blocks world”

- in Snowden, Thompson, & Troscianko (2012) on page 300: “We (well, men mainly) also make value judgements about the beauty of faces, or lack or it...” should be “...or lack of it...”

- in Snowden, Thompson, & Troscianko (2012) on page 315: “Those with lots of ‘happy’ in were nearly...” should be “Those with lots of ‘happy’ in them were nearly...”

- in Snowden, Thompson, & Troscianko (2012) on page 316: “The left side of Figure 10.21 shows someone with an ‘angry’ face, while the right side shows them with a ‘happy’ face. The face in the middle is a morphed version that most people think is neither happy nor angry.” should be “The left side of Figure 10.22 shows someone with an ‘angry’ face, while the right side shows them with a ‘happy’ face. The face in the middle is a neutral expression that most people think is neither happy nor angry.”

- in Snowden, Thompson, & Troscianko (2012) on page 316 in the caption of Figure 10.21: “Note that faces 4-6 are ambiguous and were sometimes were put in the happy category...” should be “Note that faces 4-6 are ambiguous and were sometimes were put in the happy category...”

- in Cytowic & Eagleman (2009) on page 212: “These two types of color → grapheme synesthetes...” should be “...grapheme → color synesthetes...”

 

• check out the learning resources list