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ISSN 0022-5053 (print)
E-ISSN 1538-4586 (electronic)

Last updated: April 2019

© Journal of the History of Philosophy, Inc.


Tables of Contents

The full texts of articles, discussions, and book reviews from volume 1 (1963) to the current issue are available here (via Project Muse).

Also available here are the contents and abstracts of forthcoming issues.

Forthcoming issue
July 2019 (vol. 57.3)


ARTICLES

Empeiria and Good Habits in Aristotle’s Ethics
Marta Jimenez

My goal in this paper is to draw attention to the importance of empeiria in Aristotle’s account of moral development in his ethical treatises, and concretely in his account of the formation of phronêsis. I argue that empeiria and good habits make different and complementary contributions to our moral development and to the content of our deliberations about how to act. While good habits equip us with a grasp of the proper goals of action, empeiria is in great part responsible for our eventual success in achieving such goals, by furnishing the tools both to identify and to pursue the right means towards them—two crucial functions of phronêsis


Reason in Action in Aristotle: A Reading of EE V.12/EN VI.12 
Juan S. Piñeros Glasscock

I present a reading of Eudemian Ethics V.12/Nichomachean Ethics VI.12 according to which Aristotle argues for an executive account of φρόνησις (practical wisdom) to show why it is useful to possess this virtue. On this account, the practically wise person’s actions are expressive of his knowledge of the fine, a knowledge that only the practically wise person has. This is why he must not only be a good deliberator, but also δεινότης (cunning), able to execute his actions well. An important consequence of this reading is that the debate about whether Aristotle holds a Humean account of practical reason presupposes assumptions about the scope of rationality that Aristotle rejects.


Politics and Collective Action in Thomas Aquinas’s On Kingship
Anselm Spindler

Collective action is a much-discussed topic today, but not in the historiography of philosophy. Therefore, I would like to contribute a little bit to our understanding of the history of this concept by exploring the political philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. A compelling interpretation of his treatise On Kingship emerges when we read it not, as is often the case, in terms of his moral perfectionism, but as expressing the idea that the political community is an artificial and distinct subject of agency. Thus, the political philosophy of On Kingship turns out to be congenial to contemporary approaches to collective action.


Grotius on Natural Law and Supererogation
Johan Olsthoorn

This article provides a novel interpretation of Grotius’s conception of natural law. Prior interpretations have overlooked Grotius’s doctrine of supererogation and have hence misrepresented, in varying ways, the content of his law of nature and its relation to justice and individual rights. Grotius, I contend, created logical space for supererogation by making natural obligation rather than natural morality determinative of natural law. Natural law regulates only those actions that are obligatory or illicit by their nature (i.e. without human or divine command). Acting in accordance with virtues other than justice is intrinsically morally good but not usually morally required. However, circumstances may fall out such that otherwise supererogatory actions cannot be omitted without committing a moral wrong: natural law is then rendering their performance mandatory.

Margaret Cavendish on Motion and Mereology 
Alison Peterman

Recent exciting work on Cavendish’s natural philosophy highlights the important role of motion in her system. But what is motion, according to Cavendish? I argue that motion, for Cavendish, is what I call ‘compositional motion’: for a body to be in motion is just for it to divide from some matter and join with other matter. So when Cavendish claims to reduce all natural change to motion, she is really reducing all natural change to mereological change. Cavendish also uses ‘motion’ to name the power that matter has to set itself in compositional motion. That power is not reducible to local motion. That motion is not local motion and that motive power is not a function of actual motion suggests that, despite her polemics, Cavendish does not reduce natural change to local motion. Instead, she offers a unique and exciting account of natural change. 


Free Belief: The Medieval Heritage in Kant’s Moral Faith

Christopher J. Insole

In this article, I argue that insofar as Kant describes faith as a free-choice, he is aligned with the medieval tradition, and with his own sources that mediate this heritage (in particular, Leibniz and Locke). The medieval tradition consistently, affirmatively, and systematically invokes freedom and the will, with reference to belief in God, without such a dimension of choice implying any deflation in the degree of commitment to this belief. However, in clarifying that the movement of the will involves “human freedom” alone, without divine action, Kant departs from this tradition. Such divine action, Kant is convinced, would destroy significant human freedom. This conviction is the source of Kant’s repeated insistence that grace follows rather than precedes moral conversion. It is on this point concerning human freedom and grace that Kant departs from the medieval tradition, rather than with his claim that we choose to believe in God.


NOTES AND DISCUSSION

The Contextualist Revolution in Early Modern Philosophy              
Christia Mercer

This paper examines the current state of early modern scholarship. After tracing the contours of the contextualist revolution that gained momentum in the 1980s, I argue that rational reconstructionism is a thing of the past and that early modernists are now devoted to employ all available skills, both philosophical and scholarly, to maximize our understanding of an increasingly broad range of texts and topics. I propose that our current differences concern the kinds of projects we select and the skills we use to maximize our understanding. 




2019 - volume 57
January 2019 (vol. 57.1)
April 2019 (vol. 57.2)
July 2019 (vol. 57.3) (Forthcoming)
October 2019 (vol. 57.4) (Forthcoming)



2018 - volume 56
January 2018 (vol. 56.1)
April 2018 (vol. 56.2)
July 2018 (vol. 56.3)
October 2018 (vol. 56.4)


2017 - volume 55
January 2017 (vol. 55.1)
April 2017 (vol. 55.2)
July 2017 (vol. 55.3)
October 2017 (vol. 55.4)


2016 - volume 54
January 2016 (vol. 54.1)
April 2016 (vol. 54.2)
July 2016 (vol. 54.3)
October 2016 (vol. 54.4)


2015 - volume 53
January 2015 (vol. 53.1)
April 2015 (vol. 53.2)
July 2015 (vol. 53.3)
October 2015 (vol. 53.4)


2014 - volume 52
January 2014 (vol. 52.1)
April 2014 (vol. 52.2)
July 2014 (vol. 52.3)
October 2014 (vol. 52.4)


2013 - volume 51
January 2013 (vol. 51.1)
April 2013 (vol. 51.2)
July 2013 (vol. 51.3)

October 2013 (vol. 51.4)


2012 - volume 50
January 2012 (vol. 50.1)
April 2012 (vol. 50.2)
July 2012 (vol. 50.3)
October 2012 (vol. 50.4)


2011 - volume 49
January 2011 (vol. 49.1)
April 2011 (vol. 49.2)
July 2011 (vol. 49.3)
October 2011 (vol. 49.4)

2010 - volume 48
January 2010 (vol. 48.1)
April 2010 (vol. 48.2)
July 2010 (vol. 48.3)
October 2010 (vol. 48.4)


2009 - volume 47
October 2009 (vol. 47.4)
July 2009 (vol. 47.3)
April 2009 (vol. 47.2)
January 2009 (vol. 47.1)
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2008 - volume 46
October 2008 (vol. 46.4)
July 2008 (vol. 46.3)
April 2008 (vol. 46.2)
January 2008 (vol. 46.1)
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2007 - volume 45
October 2007 (vol. 45.4)
July 2007 (vol. 45.3)
April 2007 (vol. 45.2)
January 2007 (vol. 45.1)
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2006 - volume 44
October 2006 (vol. 44.4)
July 2006 (vol. 44.3)
April 2006 (vol. 44.2)
January 2006 (vol. 44.1)
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2005 - volume 43
October 2005 (vol. 43.4)
July 2005 (vol. 43.3)
April 2005 (vol. 43.2)
January 2005 (vol. 43.1)
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2004 - volume 42
October 2004 (vol. 42.4)
July 2004 (vol. 42.3)
April 2004 (vol. 42.2)
January 2004 (vol. 42.1)
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2003 - volume 41
October 2003 (vol. 41.4)
July 2003 (vol. 41.3)
April 2003 (vol. 41.2)
January 2003 (vol. 41.1)
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2002 - volume 40
October 2002 (vol. 40.4)
July 2002 (vol. 40.3)
April 2002 (vol. 40.2)
January 2002 (vol. 40.1)
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2001 - volume 39
October 2001 (vol. 39.4)
July 2001 (vol. 39.3)
April 2001 (vol. 39.2)
January (vol. 39.1)
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2000 - volume 38
October 2000 (vol. 38.4)
July 2000 (vol. 38.3)
April 2000 (vol. 38.2)
January 2000 (vol. 38.1)
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1999 - volume 37
October 1999 (vol. 37.4)
July 1999 (vol. 37.3)
April 1999 (vol. 37.2)
January 1999 (vol. 37.1)
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1998 - volume 36
October 1998 (vol. 36.4)
July 1998 (vol. 36.3)
April 1998 (vol. 36.2)
January 1998 (vol. 36.1)
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1997 - volume 35
October 1997 (vol. 35.4)
July 1997 (vol. 35.3)
April 1997 (vol. 35.2)
January 1997 (vol. 35.1)
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1996 - volume 34
October 1996 (vol. 34.4)
July 1996 (vol. 34.3)
April 1996 (vol. 34.2)
January 1996 (vol. 34.1)
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1995 - volume 33
October 1995 (vol. 33.4)
July 1995 (vol. 33.3)
April 1995 (vol. 33.2)
January 1995 (vol. 33.1)
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1994 - volume 32
October 1994 (vol. 32.4)
July 1994 (vol. 32.3)
April 1994 (vol. 32.2)
January 1994 (vol. 32.1)
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1993 - volume 31
October 1993 (vol. 31.4)
July 1993 (vol. 31.3)
April 1993 (vol. 31.2)
January 1993 (vol. 31.1)
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1992 - volume 30
October 1992 (vol. 30.4)
July 1992 (vol. 30.3)
April 1992 (vol. 30.2)
January 1992 (vol. 30.1)
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1991 - volume 29
October 1991 (vol. 29.4)
July 1991 (vol. 29.3)
April 1991 (vol. 29.2)
January 1991 (vol. 29.1)
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1990 - volume 28
October 1990 (vol. 28.4)
July 1990 (vol. 28.3)
April 1990 (vol. 28.2)
January 1990 (vol. 28.1)
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1989 - volume 27
October 1989 (vol. 27.4)
July 1989 (vol. 27.3)
April 1989 (vol. 27.2)
January 1989 (vol. 27.1)
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1988 - volume 26
October 1988 (vol. 26.4)
July 1988 (vol. 26.3)
April 1988 (vol. 26.2)
January 1988 (vol. 26.1)
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1987 - volume 25
October 1987 (vol. 25.4)
July 1987 (vol. 25.3)
April 1987 (vol. 25.2)
January 1987 (vol. 25.1)
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1986 - volume 24
October 1986 (vol. 24.4)
July 1986 (vol. 24.3)
April 1986 (vol. 24.2)
January 1986 (vol. 24.1)
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1985 - volume 23
October 1985 (vol. 23.4)
July 1985 (vol. 23.3)
April 1985 (vol. 23.2)
January 1985 (vol. 23.1)
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1984 - volume 22
October 1984 (vol. 22.4)
July 1984 (vol. 22.3)
April 1984 (vol. 22.2)
January 1984 (vol. 22.1)
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1983 - volume 21
October 1983 (vol. 21.4)
July 1983 (vol. 21.3)
April 1983 (vol. 21.2)
January 1983 (vol. 21.1)
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1982 - volume 20
October 1982 (vol. 20.4)
July 1982 (vol. 20.3)
April 1982 (vol. 20.2)
January 1982 (vol. 20.1)
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1981 - volume 19
October 1981 (vol. 19.4)
July 1981 (vol. 19.3)
April 1981 (vol. 19.2)
January 1981 (vol. 19.1)
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1980 - volume 18
October 1980 (vol. 18.4)
July 1980 (vol. 18.3)
April 1980 (vol. 18.2)
January 1980 (vol. 18.1)
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1979 - volume 17
October 1979 (vol. 17.4)
July 1979 (vol. 17.3)
April 1979 (vol. 17.2)
January 1979 (vol. 17.1)
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1978 - volume 16
October 1978 (vol. 16.4)
July 1978 (vol. 16.3)
April 1978 (vol. 16.2)
January 1978 (vol. 16.1)
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1977 - volume 15
October 1977 (vol. 15.4)
July 1977 (vol. 15.3)
April 1977 (vol. 15.2)
January 1977 (vol. 15.1)
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1976 - volume 14
October 1976 (vol. 14.4)
July 1976 (vol. 14.3)
April 1976 (vol. 14.2)
January 1976 (vol. 14.1)
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1975 - volume 13
October 1975 (vol. 13.4)
July 1975 (vol. 13.3)
April 1975 (vol. 13.2)
January 1975 (vol. 13.1)
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1974 - volume 12
October 1974 (vol. 12.4)
July 1974 (vol. 12.3)
April 1974 (vol. 12.2)
January 1974 (vol. 12.1)
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1973 - volume 11
October 1973 (vol. 11.4)
July 1973 (vol. 11.3)
April 1973 (vol. 11.2)
January 1973 (vol. 11.1)
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1972 - volume 10
October 1972 (vol. 10.4)
July 1972 (vol. 10.3)
April 1972 (vol. 10.2)
January 1972 (vol. 10.1)
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1971 - volume 9
October 1971 (vol. 9.4)
July 1971 (vol. 9.3)
April 1971 (vol. 9.2)
January 1971 (vol. 9.1)
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1970 - volume 8
October 1970 (vol. 8.4)
July 1970 vol. 8.3)
April 1970 (vol. 8.2)
January 1970 (vol. 8.1)
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1969 - volume 7
October 1969 (vol. 7.4)
July 1969 (vol. 7.3)
April 1969 (vol. 7.2)
January 1969 (vol. 7.1)
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1968 - volume 6
October 1968 (vol. 6.4)
July 1968 (vol. 6.3)
April 1968 (vol. 6.2)
January 1968 (vol. 6.1)
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1967 - volume 5
October 1967 (vol. 5.4)
July 1967 (vol. 5.3)
April 1967 (vol. 5.2)
January 1967 (vol. 5.1)
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1966 - volume 4
October 1966 (vol. 4.4)
July 1966 (vol. 4.3)
April 1966 (vol. 4.2)
January 1966 (vol. 4.1)
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1965 - volume 3
October 1965 (vol. 3.2)
April 1965 (vol. 3.1)
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1964 - volume 2
October 1964 (vol. 2.2)
April 1964 (vol. 2.1)
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1963 - volume 1
December 1963 (vol. 1.2)
October 1963 (vol. 1.1)
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Volume by Year
2019 - volume 57
2018 - volume 56
2017 - volume 55
2016 - volume 54
2015 - volume 53

2014 - volume 52
2013 - volume 51
2012 - volume 50
2011 - volume 49
2010 - volume 48

2009 - volume 47
2008 - volume 46
2007 - volume 45
2006 - volume 44
2005 - volume 43
2004 - volume 42
2003 - volume 41
2002 - volume 40
2001 - volume 39
2000 - volume 38

1999 - volume 37
1998 - volume 36
1997 - volume 35
1996 - volume 34
1995 - volume 33
1994 - volume 32
1993 - volume 31
1992 - volume 30
1991 - volume 29
1990 - volume 28

1989 - volume 27
1988 - volume 26
1987 - volume 25
1986 - volume 24
1985 - volume 23
1984 - volume 22
1983 - volume 21
1982 - volume 20
1981 - volume 19
1980 - volume 18

1979 - volume 17
1978 - volume 16
1977 - volume 15
1976 - volume 14
1975 - volume 13
1974 - volume 12
1973 - volume 11
1972 - volume 10
1971 - volume 9
1970 - volume 8

1969 - volume 7
1968 - volume 6
1967 - volume 5
1966 - volume 4
1965 - volume 3
1964 - volume 2
1963 - volume 1